More options for reducing speculative housing!

Cornwall – a developers’ paradise comes up with a range of policies to discourage speculative housing

To discourage in-migration we must ask what causes it. Clearly, there are two main factors, one short-term and the other longer-term. First is the speculative building of a surplus of the wrong kind of housing which is then aggressively marketed upcountry. The second is the insidious role of tourism in Cornwall, which encourages temporary residence that often induces the desire for permanent.

Therefore, the answers logically have to include all or some of:
Reducing the housing target to a total that supplies the right kind of housing for local residents
Local taxes on non-resident house purchasers (similar to the extra stamp duty levied on buy-to-rent purchases)
Punitive taxes on second home ownership and the holiday let business
A cap on tourist numbers, via some kind of tourist tax
Changes to the labour market in Cornwall, introducing some form of positive discrimination for local residents
A radical change in marketing policy for Cornwall, reversing the cultural colonialist and Lifestyle Cornwall values that pervade it.

We might add some other policies:
Changing planning rules to limit house use to permanent residence rather than holiday home/let
Ensuring that planning permission is only given for houses that meet local need
Requiring change of use if a property owner wishes to continue with or change use to a holiday home/let

https://cornwalldevelopersparadise.wordpress.com/2018/11/03/living-in-the-end-times-the-cornish-crisis-ramps-up/

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Cornwall heading for disaster!

Do not forget to read this – the latest on how population growth fuelled by house building is destroying Cornwall.

Living in the end times? The Cornish crisis ramps up.
Are we living through the end times in Cornwall, doomed to survive into what Neil Kennedy has called Kernowland? This is a post-Cornish Cornwall, stripped of its indigenous, native cultures, even as token signage in re-written medieval Cornish proliferates and St Piran’s flag flies proudly up and down the land. Neil’s warning that we are headed for a ‘Cornish pastiche’, where cultural nationalism has been co-opted into a lightly green-washed Lifestyle Cornwall marketed to outsiders, takes on more urgency when we consider the latest in-migration statistics.

For more: https://cornwalldevelopersparadise.wordpress.com/

In-migration up as more houses built!

The text below is from ‘Cornwall a developers’ paradise?

Are we living through the end times in Cornwall, doomed to survive into what Neil Kennedy has called Kernowland? This is a post-Cornish Cornwall, stripped of its indigenous, native cultures, even as token signage in re-written medieval Cornish proliferates and St Piran’s flag flies proudly up and down the land. Neil’s warning that we are headed for a ‘Cornish pastiche’, where cultural nationalism has been co-opted into a lightly green-washed Lifestyle Cornwall marketed to outsiders, takes on more urgency when we consider the latest in-migration statistics.

These show conclusively that we are now living through another period of crisis, another phase of the social transformation that got under way back in the 1960s. This has quickened pace again as policy-makers in Cornwall resort to failed policies of population-led growth, this time to save their own sorry skins, rather than the Cornish economy, as was the case in the 1980s.

The latest data for 2016-17 show net in-migration running at a rate unparalleled since the 1980s. Cornwall last year experienced a pro-rata in-migration rate three times higher than that into England, Scotland or Wales. Moreover, not one English county came close to the Cornish rate.

If you think this has always been the case, then think again. Here’s a map of the same measure for the years 2006-11, before the unitary authority was imposed, with its Tory and then Lib Dem administrations, both backed by the Independents and all of them committed to a frenzied building spree. Rates of in-migration were high back in the 2000s, but not by any means the highest in the British Isles.

What’s changed? Cornwall Council will deny it until they’re blue in the face but the coincidence between record levels of in-migration and record levels of housebuilding is interesting to say the least. Of course, the Council refuses to gather data on the origins of the residents of all the new houses they’re encouraging. Councillors and planners know they know full well what the answer will be, even as they proudly bleat about meeting ‘local need’.

People might be forgiven if they throw their hands up in despair at this unprecedented level of in-migration. Actually, a lot could be done if only the tools were available, the long-term thinking indulged in, and the political will in place.

For a start we don’t have to stop all migration or end so-called ‘freedom of movement’. This is a lazy distraction touted by those who defend and/or profit from mass in-migration. Gross out-migration is running at something over 20,000 a year, with gross in-migration at 27,000. To restore a balance to net migration we either have to encourage more out-migration or discourage in-migration, not stop the process completely.

To discourage in-migration we must ask what causes it. Clearly, there are two main factors, one short-term and the other longer-term. First is the speculative building of a surplus of the wrong kind of housing which is then aggressively marketed upcountry. The second is the insidious role of tourism in Cornwall, which encourages temporary residence that often induces the desire for permanent.

Therefore, the answers logically have to include all or some of:
• Reducing the housing target to a total that supplies the right kind of housing for local residents
• Local taxes on non-resident house purchasers (similar to the extra stamp duty levied on buy-to-rent purchases)
• Punitive taxes on second home ownership and the holiday let business
• A cap on tourist numbers, via some kind of tourist tax
• Changes to the labour market in Cornwall, introducing some form of positive discrimination for local residents
• A radical change in marketing policy for Cornwall, reversing the cultural colonialist and Lifestyle Cornwall values that pervade it.

Some may point out these modest suggestions are hardly defined as practical politics at present, so in the long-term they require a degree of political autonomy or a considerable measure of independence.

Others might argue it’s time to write off the Cornish people as a historical dodo and focus on the global end times of species extinction and planetary suicide that we’re all causing. But if you’re prepared to casually write off one of Europe’s oldest indigenous peoples, then what hope is there for the planet?

https://cornwalldevelopersparadise.wordpress.com/2018/11/03/living-in-the-end-times-the-cornish-crisis-ramps-up/

Climate breakdown – its happening, so where is the action?

More evidence of climate breakdown from the Met Office. Not that policymakers think it’s an issue. Fuel duty frozen, more roads planned and more housing development – the opposite of what we should be doing.

The UK has experienced more weather extremes over the last 10 years when compared with previous decades, a Met Office report has said. The hottest days have become almost 1C hotter, warm spells have increased, while the coldest days are not as cold. The number of so-called tropical nights – when temperatures stay above 20C – is increasing. The Met Office says these changes are consistent with warming driven by human activities. The new study compares UK weather data from the period 1961-1990 with the 10 years between 2008 and 2017.

The study finds that on average the hottest day in each year over the recent 10-year period is 0.8C warmer than it was when compared to the earlier decades. The coldest days and nights have also become warmer, with temperatures on average 1.7C milder in recent years. To illustrate just how mild temperatures have been between 2008 and 2017, the report says that a significant area inland from the UK coast had, on average, less than one day per year with temperatures below zero.

One intriguing finding has been about what are termed tropical nights, when temperatures stay above 20C. In the 30 years between 1961 and 1990 there were just eight nights that exceeded that mark. In the 10 years between 2008 and 2017, there were four such nights. In 2018, which is not covered in the study, there were two warm nights that stayed above 20C. The Met Office expects to see more tropical nights as our climate continues to warm. These can be a big risk for elderly people. “A particular concern for the health impacts of heat waves are these tropical nights where the human body doesn’t get respite from the heat,” said Dr Mark McCarthy from the Met Office’s National Climate Information Centre. “That is particularly so in large cities where it is further exacerbated by the urban heat island effect where the city will retain more of the heat of the day. “Of those places where we do see tropical nights most frequently, London is one of those areas where it does occur. It could become a very important index in future.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46064266

More houses at Fowey – why so many?

News that permission has been given for more houses in Fowey, on top of other permissions.

More houses needed in Fowey – really, is this a joke?

In 2011, 29% of houses were not used as residences.

And according to hometogo there are about 800 houses and apartments in and around Fowey available as holiday lets.

So plenty of houses, just not used for housing people!

Time to bite the bullet and restrict the use of houses to homes for residents and cut out housing designed to attract people to Cornwall.

Cornwall’s councillors approve 46 more houses at Fowey right next to the Tristan stone, to complement the Wainhomes housing across the road. For whom? Cultural philistines vandalising Cornwall’s heritage.

https://twitter.com/bernarddeacon?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/homes-approved-greenfield-edge-fowey-2163757

We are killing off other species at a high rate – but lets carry on consuming more and building more houses!

The impact of more people, consuming more resources is clearly having an impact. Not that the Government or most policy makers care. They just plan for more people, and more consumption including energy use and more housing.

“Exploding human consumption” has caused a massive drop in global wildlife populations in recent decades, the WWF conservation group says.
In a report, the charity says losses in vertebrate species – mammals, fish, birds, amphibians and reptiles – averaged 60% between 1970 and 2014.
“Earth is losing biodiversity at a rate seen only during mass extinctions,” the WWF’s Living Planet Report adds.
It urges policy makers to set new targets for sustainable development.
The Living Planet Report, published every two years, aims to assess the state of the world’s wildlife.
The 2018 edition says only a quarter of the world’s land area is now free from the impact of human activity and the proportion will have fallen to just a 10th by 2050.
The change is being driven by ever-rising food production and increased demand for energy, land and water.
Although forest loss has been slowed by reforestation in some regions in recent decades, the loss has “accelerated in tropical forests that contain some of the highest levels of biodiversity on Earth”, the report notes.

It says South and Central America suffered the most dramatic decline in vertebrate populations – an 89% loss in vertebrate populations compared with 1970.
Marine freshwater species are particularly at risk, the report says. Plastic pollution has been detected in the deepest parts of the word’s oceans, including the bottom of the Mariana Trench in the Pacific.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46028862